Biography of Marianne Moore

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Read Biography of Marianne MooreMarianne Moore was born on November 15, 1887 in Kirkwood, Missouri, U.S. & died on February 5, 1972 New York City, New York, U.S., was an American Modernist poet and writer noted for her irony and wit.

Moore was born in the manse of thePresbyterian church where her maternal grandfather, John Riddle Warner, served as pastor. She was the daughter of construction engineer and inventor John Milton Moore and his wife, Mary Warner. She grew up in her grandfather’s household, her father having left the family before her birth. In 1905, Moore entered Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania and graduated four years later. She taught at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, until 1915, when Moore began to publish poetry professionally.

Moore came to the attention of poets as diverse as Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams, H.D., T. S. Eliot, and Ezra Pound beginning with her first publication in 1915. From 1925 until 1929, Moore served as editor of the literary and cultural journal The Dial. This continued her role, similar to that of Pound, as a patron of poetry; much later, she encouraged promising young poets, including Elizabeth Bishop, Allen Ginsberg, John Ashbery and James Merrill.

In 1933, Moore was awarded the Helen Haire Levinson Prize from Poetry. Her Collected Poems of 1951 is perhaps her most rewarded work; it earned the poet the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and the Bollingen Prize.

In 1955, Moore was informally invited by David Wallace, manager ofmarketing research for Ford’s “E-car” project, and his co-worker Bob Young to provide input with regard to the naming of the car. Wallace’s rationale was “Who better to understand the nature of words than a poet?” On October 1955, Moore was approached to submit “inspirational names” for the E-car, and on November 7, she offered her list of names, which included such notables as “Resilient Bullet”, “Ford Silver Sword”, “Mongoose Civique”, “Varsity Stroke”, “Pastelogram” and “Andante con Moto.” On December 8, she submitted her last and most famous name, “Utopian Turtletop.” The E-car was finally christened by Ford as the Edsel.

Not long after throwing the first pitch for the 1968 season in Yankee Stadium, Moore suffered a stroke. She suffered a series of strokes thereafter, and died in 1972. She was interred in Gettysburg’sEvergreen Cemetery.

Moore never married. Her living room has been preserved in its original layout in the collections of the Rosenbach Museum & Library in Philadelphia. Her entire library, knick-knacks (including a baseball signed by Mickey Mantle), all of her correspondence, photographs, and poetry drafts are available for public viewing.

Like Robert Lowell, Moore revised a great many of her early poems in later life. These appeared in The Complete Poems of 1967, after which critics tended to accept as canonical the “elderly Moore’s revisions of the exuberant texts of her own poetic youth.” Facsimile editions of the theretofore out-of-print 1924 Observations became available in 2002. Since that time there has been no critical consensus about which versions are authoritative.

In 1996, she was inducted into the St. Louis Walk of Fame.

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