Biography of Ogden Nash

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Read Biography of Ogden NashFrederic Ogden Nash was born on August 19, 1902 in Rye, New York & died on May 19, 1971 in Baltimore, Maryland, was an American poet well known for his light verse. His father owned and operated an import-export company, and because of business obligations, the family relocated often.

Graduated from St. George’s School inMiddletown, Rhode Island, Nash enteredHarvard University in 1920, only to drop out a year later. He returned to St. George’s to teach for a year and left to work his way through a series of other jobs, eventually landing a position as an editor at Doubleday publishing house, where he first began to write poetry.

Nash moved to Baltimore, Maryland, three years after marrying Frances Leonard, a Baltimore native. He lived in Baltimore from 1934 and most of his life until his death in 1971. Nash thought of Baltimore as home. After his return from a brief move to New York, he wrote “I could have loved New York had I not loved Balti-more.”

When Nash wasn’t writing poems, he made guest appearances on comedy and radio shows and toured the United States and England, giving lectures at colleges and universities.

Nash was regarded respectfully by the literary establishment, and his poems were frequently anthologized even in serious collections such as Selden Rodman’s 1946 A New Anthology of Modern Poetry.

Nash was the lyricist for the Broadway musical One Touch of Venus, collaborating with librettist S. J. Perelman and composer Kurt Weill. The show included the notable song “Speak Low”. He also wrote the lyrics for the 1952 revue Two’s Company.

Nash died of Crohn’s disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore on May 19, 1971. He is interred in North Hampton, New Hampshire’s East Side Cemetery. His daughter Isabel was married to noted photographer Fred Eberstadt, and his granddaughter, Fernanda Eberstadt, is an acclaimed author.

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